The Last Tic

I feel like in the last chapter of the book, many of the questions that had been lurking had finally been answered. Such as how Julia and Frank had met, and why their marriage had been so strange. But most importantly, it answered the question of why Frank Minna was really killed and who played a part in it. Throughout the novel I’d been scrapping together bits of information that I’d collected from characters and I had been so confused as to what it all meant, but it finally all tied together in the end. Similarly, I feel like things finally tied together for Lionel in the end. Although he will never be able to forget the death of Frank and Tony, he can let go of his compulsive need to find the truth about Frank’s death.

I was satisfied with the ending of the novel for the most part, except for how things turned out between Kimmery and Lionel. I felt sympathy for Lionel, and I would have liked the ending better if after all the trouble Lionel had gone through over the past few days he could return and have an actual relationship with Kimmery, instead of her rejecting him because of her psychologically abusive ex-boyfriend. For the first time in Lionel’s life he had found a woman he could get close to without the assistance of alcohol, but for some reason Jonathan Lethem made sure it was over before it really started.

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Reading Response #4 (due Sept 26)

Read until the end of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to either one or both of the questions below. Your choice. The total for your entire response should be between 200-300 words. If you feel you have enough to say about just one of these questions, then just answer one. If you find you have a little bit to say about each, answer both. Include at least a couple of references or citations in your response.

  1. Does Lionel get what he wants at the end? Why or why not?
  2. Do you consider this a satisfying ending? Why or why not? (by “ending” I don’t mean just the last few paragraphs. I mean the way the book wraps up, the last chapter or so).

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. Please write your full name at the bottom of your response so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author. If your post is too similar to any posts above yours, I’ll assume you copied it/them.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.

You may not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

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Reading Response #3 (due Sept. 19)

Please read until page 240 of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to the two questions below. The TOTAL for the two responses should be a minimum of 200 and a maximum of 300 words (so, about 100-150 words for each question). Please cite at least one passage in each response.

  • Look carefully at Lionel’s interactions with Kimmery in her apartment. What is different about Lionel’s relationship with Kimmery as his relationships with everyone else? In other words, what is different about how Lionel feels around her, and about how she treats him?
  • How would you describe Lionel’s conversation with Gerard? How does Lionel feel around Gerard, and how does Gerard treat Lionel?

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. Please write your full name at the bottom of your response so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author. If your post is too similar to any posts above yours, I’ll assume you copied it/them.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.

You may not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

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Reading Response #2 (due Sep. 12)

Please read until page 145 of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to the prompt below. Your response should be a minimum of 200 and a maximum of 300 words. Please cite at least two passages in your response.

  • In what ways can we see Lionel begin to change in pages 90-145? What aspects of his character come out that we may not have seen before? For each point you make, refer to a specific moment from these pages in order to illustrate your point. You can look for specific moments when Lionel does or say something surprising or funny. You’ll want to concentrate largely on his interactions with other characters. To earn full marks, you’ll want to make it clear that you read up until page 145, so try to refer to a few different moments spread throughout these pages.

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. Please write your full name at the bottom of your response so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author. If your post is too similar to any posts above yours, I’ll assume you copied it/them.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.

You may not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

 

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Reading Response #1 (due Sep 1)

Please read until page 35 of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to the prompt below. Your response should be a minimum of 200 and a maximum of 300 words. Please cite at least one passage in your response.

  • What effect do Lionel’s tics serve in this chapter? What do they add to either the tone of the story, his character, his relationship with the other characters, the story, etc. How would you describe his verbal tics? Do they remind you of anything (a character from a movie, a song, a poem, a book, etc.)?

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. At the bottom of your response, please write your full name so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

You will not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.