Homework for Oct. 6

FeaturedHomework for Oct. 6
  1. Carefully read the instructions on how to integrate citations
  • Look at how to format the sentence before a citation.
  • Look at how to  punctuate the beginning and endings of citations.
  • Look at how to handle citations of more than three lines.
  • Look at how to handle dialogue.
  • Work on the citations for your draft. Make sure the sentences before the citations are doing what they are supposed to do.
  • Make sure everything is punctuated and formatted properly.

2. Read this article on how to write the perfect logline.

You can think the main idea of your essay, or the thesis statement, as the log line for the film. After all, you’re focusing on that one aspect as the major, overarching glue holding the novel together.

Essentially, you want to think more about the aspect you’ve chosen. So, for example, say you’ve chosen dialogue. Great. What statement are you going to make about dialogue?

It shouldn’t simply read as a summary of the novel. Each person in this class should be able to come up with a different log line, or main idea.

  • By following the recommendations in the article above, try to write a log line for your version of the film. This can essentially serve as the main idea of your paper.
  • (give it a shot, but if you find the idea of a log line confusing, just try to think of a main idea for your paper)
  • Or, maybe you already have a sentence in your draft that would make a strong main idea for your next draft? If so, underline it.

 

Notes:

  • There is nothing to hand in for Thursday. Work on the above elements, and bring a digital copy of your latest draft to the lab. We’ll continue working on it there.
  • The schedule says that you have a reading due next class. I’m changing that, so there’s no reading due next class. You will have a reading assignment from Voyage in the Dark due on Oct. 12, so if you want to start reading it in advance, go ahead. If you choose to do so, here’s a question to start thinking about:
  • In what ways can Anna be considered an underdog or an outsider?

 

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Making Connections

Task one: Warm-up

A short creative exercise to warm up and get your brain working.

You’re going to write a Bio-Poem for Lionel Essrog. This is a poem that has a formulaic structure to explore a character. The formula goes like this:

 

Line 1: First name

Line 2: Four traits that describe his character

Line 3: Friend of (or coworker of, enemy of, etc)

Line 4: Lover of (list three things or people)

Line 5: Who feels (three items)

Line 6: Who needs (three items)

Line 7: Who fears (three items)

Line 8: Who gives (three items)

Line 9: Who would like to (three items)

Line 10: Resident of __________ (you could say Brooklyn, or you could say something else? Doesn’t have to be a physical place)

Line 11: Last name

 

Example, on Dostoyevsky’s Grand Inquisitor:

Inquisitor,

Cynical, bold, all knowing, and fearless.

Friend of no one, peer of few.

Lover of self, wisdom, and unconquerable knowledge.

Who feels neither pity nor compassion nor the love of God.

Who needs no man, save for himself.

Who fears the kiss that warms his heart

And the coming tide which will not retreat.

Who radiates cold shafts of broken glass

And who fits all making with collar and chain.

Who would like to see the deceivers burned

And Crhist to be humbled before him.

Resident of ages past,

“The Grand Inquisitor.”

 

This exercise is from:

Bean, John C. Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking,and Active Learning in the Classroom. 2nd ed. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2011. Print. Pages 139-39.

 

Task two: Close reading of a scene

Whatever aspect you choose to write about, you’ll need evidence from the novel. One way to include evidence from a novel is to do a close reading of a scene. A close reading means to look carefully at a specific scene, talk about what’s going on beneath the surface, and discuss how it fits into greater patterns in the novel. While discussing the scene, it’s important to keep in mind the context, where we are in the novel, and where the protagonist is on his journey.

For task two, choose a scene from the novel that can be used in your rough draft as an example of the aspect you’ve chosen to discuss.

Write the page ranges. Write where we are in the novel. What’s happening? Where are we at with the story? Where is Lionel at? Write this in one or two sentences. 

Then freewrite for the allotted time on any ideas that come to mind about the scene. Things you can think about:

  • How does the aspect you’ve chosen to write about stand out in this scene? If you haven’t chosen an aspect yet, you can find them listed on the instructions.
  • How does this aspect help give us information about what’s going on beneath the surface?
  • What new information does Lionel learn?
  • What is the relationship between the characters? How do they feel about each other?
  • What does each character want in this situation? What is standing in their way?
  • What are the characters feeling in this situation? Is there a contrast between what they’re feeling and what they’re showing to the other characters?
  • Who has the power in this situation? Is there a power struggle?
  • Is there any interesting or noteworthy imagery? What information does the imagery convey that is not literally stated?
  • Are there any original uses of language? Metaphor, or figurative language? What do Lionel’s thoughts tell us?
  • Is there any interesting dialogue?
  • Is the setting important?
  • What is the tone or mood?
  • How does this scene fit into greater themes or patterns in the novel?

You don’t necessarily have to answer all or any of these questions. They’re mean to spark ideas.

Reread the scene, and then just blast one some ideas.

 

Task three: Making connections

To analyse means to discuss the relationship between different parts of a thing. In this case, you’re discussing how the various parts of the novel all fit together. One effective way to do that is either to compare two excerpts from the novel (discuss their similarities) or contrast them (discuss their differences). Comparing and contrasting is essential in trying to make sense of a novel.

Compare or contrast the scene you wrote about in task two to another scene in the novel.

Write, “The above scene reminds me of…” if you’re comparing.

Write, “The above scene contrasts with…” if you’re contrasting.

Then do a close reading of the new scene that you’ve chosen. Freewrite for the allotted time. All of the questions in task four still apply. You can also discuss the similarities or differences to the scene in task four.

 

Task four: Make further connections

Look through the novel for more scenes that you might compare and contrast in your rough draft. Group them together in bunches that either express similarity or difference. Make a few notes on each. These bunches of scenes could serve as a kind of outline for your rough draft.

Example (my examples are made up. Yours should actually be from the novel):

  • P. 242-251 Lionel at the car wash
  • P. 12-15: Lionel at the barber
  • P. 369-371: Matricarde and Rockaforte meet Loomis
  • All three of these show how much Lionel loves licorice. He loves licorice too much? Or not enough? Black or red licorice? How does licorice fit in with Frank’s murder.

 

  • P. 60-70: French class
  • P. 236-240: Lionel bakes a cake
  • These 2 scenes conflict with each other. In one, Lionel talks about his mother driving him to Karate class. In the second, he says he walks everywhere. Lying? False memory? Drugs?

Task five: Write your rough draft

If you have time remaining after completing the above tasks, continue writing your rough draft.

 

 

At the end of the lab, post to “Making Connections” category. Include your name, title, feature image, as usual.

 

  • For next time, your rough drafts are due. They are to be submitted on the blog, as per the instructions.
  • Please also print out a double spaced copy and bring it to class. You won’t be handing this in, but we’ll be working with them in class. They’ll be a kind of peer review / idea generating session.
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Reading Response #4 (due Sept 26)

Read until the end of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to either one or both of the questions below. Your choice. The total for your entire response should be between 200-300 words. If you feel you have enough to say about just one of these questions, then just answer one. If you find you have a little bit to say about each, answer both. Include at least a couple of references or citations in your response.

  1. Does Lionel get what he wants at the end? Why or why not?
  2. Do you consider this a satisfying ending? Why or why not? (by “ending” I don’t mean just the last few paragraphs. I mean the way the book wraps up, the last chapter or so).

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. Please write your full name at the bottom of your response so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author. If your post is too similar to any posts above yours, I’ll assume you copied it/them.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.

You may not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

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Creativity Lab

Task one: freewritin’

Where do ideas come from? How do ideas take shape? Who the hell knows. They come from some mysterious higher power in the universe. A universal energy that we can all tap into.

How do we tap into it? Who the hell knows. But, one thing that’s helpful is to imagine that this greater creative energy exists, and to try to be receptive to it. One way is to just write, with no direction, and no clear goal.

In this task, write as much as you can about the novel in the time permitted. The question is simple:

Do you like the novel or not? Why or why not? What do you like or dislike most about it?

Task two: Any questions?

Write as many questions about the novel as you can think of. These can be factual questions (Who abducts Lionel in the meditation place?) or analytical questions (Why does Lionel like food so much?) or quirky (what kind of a name is Kimmery????)

Let ‘er rip.

Task three: Aspects.

Look at the different aspects of the novel you can choose to write about for the Film Adaptation Assignment. Copy and paste the list. For each one, write a few sentences. Just get some ideas across. Some things you can think about:

Do I want to write about this? Why or why not? What do I immediately think of when I think of this aspect? What’s most interesting, curious, or noteworthy about it? Write as many questions as you can think of. Which specific scenes from the novel does it make you think of? Etc. etc. Get some initial ideas down. You probably won’t have time to do this with all, so start with whichever you think you might want to write about most, and work your way down from there.

Task four: Underdogs, outcasts, loners

Think of a moment in your life when you felt like an underdog, or an outcast, or a loner. Anytime when you didn’t fit in, or when the odds were stacked against you. Pick a specific moment. High school is not a specific moment. That day in high school when I was picked last for the softball game is a specific moment. Or, if there was a period of time where you felt like one of the above things, write about a typical day from this period.

Have fun with this. Do it! Have fun! Now!

Task five: a scene from another character’s perspective

Pick a scene from the novel. Your choice. Let’s say, pick two or three pages from that scene. Rewrite it, but from one of the other characters’ perspectives. What do they think about Lionel? What kind of thoughts are going through their heads. Ha! This is gonna be hilarious!

Task six: Psycho-therapy

You are a therapist and Lionel has asked you for a diagnosis about what the greatest obstacle to his own happiness is. Write him a short letter with your professional diagnosis. You do not need to know anything about psychology to do this. I mean, just being a human and living in the world until now qualifies you.

Task seven: Haiku!

This is what a Haiku is. 

Write a Haiku that encapsulates Lionel’s plight in this novel.

When you’re done, give your post a title, feature image, and publish the following category: Creativity Lab.

 

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Film Adaptation Project Rough Draft Instructions

The rough draft for your Film Adaptation Project is due on Monday October 3, by 12:00 PM (the start of our class). 

Most of what you need to know is in the project’s instructions. Read them carefully.

What you must produce with your first draft:

A full, 1,200 word draft (including citations). 

Basically, your goal for your rough draft is to get all your ideas down. Get ’em down. By the time you’re finished your rough draft, you should know which aspect of the novel you think the film adaptation should focus on. You should know which citations you’re going to be discussing, and what you’re going to be saying about them. You should have all of your points and ideas down on paper.

You do not need to have a clear idea of what your main point is while you’re writing your rough draft. Don’t worry about a main point yet. It’ll come to you. One of the purposes of a rough draft, as I see it, is to discover what your main point. Through a careful examination of the evidence in the book, and in writing about it, your main point will emerge.

It’s like one of those pictures that contain a hidden image. Once you stare it for long enough, and allow your focus to soften, you start to see a picture hidden within a pattern. Same thing with a novel. Once you allow yourself to stare at it long enough, and write about it, a main idea for your paper will emerge. The fun part is that a novel is like one of those images where everyone can see something different.

So, rather than making sure you have a main idea or a thesis before you begin, think of your rough draft as a journey to try and find your main idea. Must less pressure!

What you need to know before you start your rough draft: which aspect you wish to focus on.

What should be clearer after you finish your rough draft: How does this aspect add depth and meaning to the novel?

Bullet points for rough draft:

  • Length? 1,200 words (including citations)
  • Do we need citations from the novel? Yes. Figure around ten. Your citations should come from as many different parts of the novel as possible. Try to integrate them properly. Here is a PDF document explaining how to integrate citations.
  • How should I structure it? Up to you. Figure that 1,200 words is about 5-7 paragraphs. Ish.
  • Do we need an intro and conclusion? You need an opening and a closing. Doesn’t need to adhere to rigid academic intro and conclusion. Piece of advice: Openings and closings should be the last things you write. You can worry more about these for the final draft.
  • How “rough” can it be? As I said, you should try to get your ideas down on paper, your citations, etc. It doesn’t necessarily have to be structured into a logical order yet. Figure that you’ll move things around for your final draft. Otherwise, don’t sweat the writing or expression yet. I’m looking for your ideas, not the style or the quality of the writing. The purpose of a rough draft is to be a messy, exploratory exercise. I prefer the French word, “brouillon.”
  • I don’t need a main idea? It should be totally clear which aspect of the novel from the list in the instructions that you’re discussing. For the final draft, you’ll need to say something specific about this aspect: how and why does it depth to the novel? You can keep that question in mind as you’re writing your rough draft, but you don’t need to have a fully formulated thesis statement or main idea yet. You can write in a disorganized way about the aspect you’ve chosen, and see what comes to you.
  • Can we include hyperlinks and photos? It should be clear by now how much I love hyperlinks and photos. Go nuts.
  • Can we show you a copy of our draft at any part of the process? PLEASE DO.
  • Do we need a list of Works Cited? You sure do.
  • Can I use secondary sources? Of course. You always can. You don’t have to, but you can. If you use any secondary sources, simply cite them in your text and in your list of Works Cited. Refer to the Dawson Library for instructions on how to do that, or ask me. If you use any secondary sources and don’t cite them, it’s plagiarism and blah, blah, blah… Let’s all behave like responsible academics here. Thanks.
  • Publish as a post. Include a title, feature image, and write your name in the body of the post. Category: FA Project Rough Draft
  • Please print a copy and bring it to class on Oct. 3. You’re not handing it in, but we’re going to do a peer review/idea sharing session.

 

How you will be graded for rough draft

Total marks: 10

  • You’ve written about 1,200 words: 2 marks
  • You’ve included enough citations (about 10) from different parts of the novel: 2 marks
  • It’s clear which aspect of the novel you’re discussing: 2 marks
  • You’re providing substantial analysis of the citations you provide, you are making connections, considering the context of each citation, discussing literary devices, writing at the height of your intelligence: 4 marks

 

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Reading Response #3 (due Sept. 19)

Please read until page 240 of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to the two questions below. The TOTAL for the two responses should be a minimum of 200 and a maximum of 300 words (so, about 100-150 words for each question). Please cite at least one passage in each response.

  • Look carefully at Lionel’s interactions with Kimmery in her apartment. What is different about Lionel’s relationship with Kimmery as his relationships with everyone else? In other words, what is different about how Lionel feels around her, and about how she treats him?
  • How would you describe Lionel’s conversation with Gerard? How does Lionel feel around Gerard, and how does Gerard treat Lionel?

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. Please write your full name at the bottom of your response so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author. If your post is too similar to any posts above yours, I’ll assume you copied it/them.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.

You may not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

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Humour exercise

PDF document explaining how to integrate citations

In the lab today, you will discuss the use of humour in pages 145-203

The situation: You write for a humour blog. This is a blog that discusses the mechanics of humour—how it works, where it comes from, etc. Essentially, it’s a blog for comedy nerds, people who love to talk about and read about comedy.

Your task: You will discuss why three specific moments from pages 145-203 are either good or bad examples of humour in fiction. Basically, if you think it’s funny, it’s a good example. If you think it’s not funny, it’s a bad example. Have one opinion throughout: you either think all three examples are funny or they’re all not funny. Whatever you genuinely feel.

Write a short blog post where you look in depth at these three specific moments. For each moment, do the following:

  1. Include a citation. This should be an example of Lethem’s attempt at humour. Make sure you integrate it properly. It should have a proper contextualizing sentence, and proper punctuation. Use each method of integrating a citation once.
  2. After each citation, dissect what Lethem is attempting to do. Specifically identify which of the following humour methods he’s trying to use. One example can contain more than one of these techniques:
  1. Straight man / funny man
  2. Misunderstanding
  3. Irony: we know something one of the characters doesn’t
  4. Wordplay
  5. Characters
  6. Absurdity
  7. Repetition
  8. Escalation:
  1. Specify why each example either works for you as a piece of humour, or doesn’t work for you. What, exactly, do you find funny about it? Or, what, exactly, turns you off about it?

There’s no specific length for this exercise. You should sit here and write for the entire time.

There’s no structure you need to follow. I figure it will be about one or two paragraphs. Or you can write a short paragraph about each example. Up to you.

Consider your audience: You’re writing for people who love comedy. Comedy aficionados.

Consider your tone: You’re writing about humour. Feel free to be playful in your writing. This doesn’t need to sound like a school essay. How will you write in a way to capture your reader’s attention? How you will open your blog post in an interesting way?

 

Last steps:

  1. Write your name in the body of the text.
  2. Give your blog post a title.
  3. Insert a feature image.
  4. Make sure it’s in the correct category: Humour exercise
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Reading Response #2 (due Sep. 12)

Please read until page 145 of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to the prompt below. Your response should be a minimum of 200 and a maximum of 300 words. Please cite at least two passages in your response.

  • In what ways can we see Lionel begin to change in pages 90-145? What aspects of his character come out that we may not have seen before? For each point you make, refer to a specific moment from these pages in order to illustrate your point. You can look for specific moments when Lionel does or say something surprising or funny. You’ll want to concentrate largely on his interactions with other characters. To earn full marks, you’ll want to make it clear that you read up until page 145, so try to refer to a few different moments spread throughout these pages.

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. Please write your full name at the bottom of your response so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author. If your post is too similar to any posts above yours, I’ll assume you copied it/them.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.

You may not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

 

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Exercise: Pages 1-35 Instructions (in-class exercise)

Motherless Brooklyn, pages 1-35, research exercise (in-class, Sep 1)

You will be split into groups. Each group will be assigned one of the following categories to work on. Your goal will be to publish one blog post for your group that researches one element of the novel, and compares what you found in your research to specific moments from the first 35 pages.

What you will need to do:

  1. Create a post. Give your post an appropriate title (based on the category you are working on)
  2. Insert a featured image into post.
  3. Write the names of the members of the group at the top of the post.
  4. Write a short paragraph detailing one interesting thing you discovered during your research.
  5. Include one secondary source that discusses the aspect of the novel you’re discussing. You will include this source either as a hyperlink, or as a posted video, or picture.
  6. Then, make a connection between what you found in your research and the chapter you’ve read for today. Illustrate this connection by including one citation from the novel. Discuss how this citation is an interesting connection to what you found in your research.
  7. If you have time, repeat step 6 with another citation.

Categories:

  1. The city:
  • Research options: Brooklyn and/or Manhattan in the 90s; Greenpoint; Go on Google Earth and look at the locations that Lionel goes to. How is the real image of it similar/different from his description?
  • In the novel: Cite one image of the city. How is the city described? What does it mean to Lionel?
  1. References:
  • Look up one of the following references in the novel: White Castle (2); Kaos and Control (2); Monopoly pieces/Candyland/in the study with Colonel Mustard (3); Robert-Ryan-in-Wild-Bunch (6).
  • What can you tell us about these references. What do they tell us about Lionel’s character? About the world we’re inhabiting? About the tone of the novel?
  1. Lionel:
  • Who does Lionel remind you of? Why? Give us a link to something about this character, a video clip or photo or Wikipedia page.
  • Find one citation from the novel that demonstrates something about Lionel’s character, or where the connection to the above person is evident.
  1. Lionel’s tics:
  • Research Tourettes.
  • Cite one moment where Lionel’s Tourette’s comes out. What role do his tics play in the tone of the story, and how he relates to other people? Look closely at one verbal tic. If this was a poem, what might you say about it?
  1. Minna
  • Do research on relationships in fiction.
  • Cite one moment when Lionel’s relationship to Minna is evident. How would you describe how Lionel feels about Minna, and how Minna feels about Lionel?
  1. Gilbert
  • Do research on relationships in fiction.
  • Cite one moment when Lionel’s relationship to Gilbert is evident. How would you describe how Lionel feels about Gilbert, and how Gilbert feels about Lionel?
  1. Dialogue
  • Research how to write good dialogue.
  • Cite one moment of interesting dialogue. What is interesting or noteworthy about the dialogue?
  1. Story
  • Research principles of good storytelling.
  • What is interesting about how the story unfolds in the first chapter? How is the rest of the story set up for us?
  1. Hard boiled
  • Do some more research on hard boiled conventions.
  • Cite one moment from the novel where hard boiled conventions are either adopted or broken.

10. Humour

  • Research how to write humour.
  • Cite one moment from the novel that you found funny. What, exactly, is funny about it?

When you’re done, make sure to give your post and appropriate title and set an appropriate featured image!

 

Sample post (I used “I”. You can use “we.”)

Let’s say my category is tone.

By reading the Wikipedia entry about Tone in literature, I realized that I’ve been confusing the concepts of tone and mood. I thought tone was just an overall feeling that a piece has, but apparently that’s closer to mood. According to Wikipedia, “Tone and mood are not the same, although they are frequently confused. The mood of a piece of literature is the feeling or atmosphere created by the work, or, said slightly differently, how the work makes the reader feel. Mood is produced most effectively through the use of setting, theme, voice and tone, while tone is how the author feels about something.” Literary-Devices.com sheds some more light on the idea of tone: “The tone of a literary work is the perspective or attitude that the author adopts with regards to a specific character, place or development. Tone can portray a variety of emotions ranging from solemn, grave, and critical to witty, wry and humorous.” This makes sense, as a concept. So, like a movie can have a comedic tone, by have a dark mood. I guess?

In that case, I would say the tone of the first chapter is humourous, funny. I find the style of the writing and the reactions of the characters to be comedic, almost cartoonish, even though the subject matter is pretty serious. It seems like Lethem is really playing with the genre of detective fiction, having fun with it. One place where I felt this is when Gilbert is talking to Minna before he goes into the Zendo:

“We’re not carrying,” said Coney.

“What?” said Minna.

“A piece, I don’t have a piece.”

“What’s with piece? Say gun, Gilbert.”

“No gun, Frank.” (8)

I find this really funny because it subverts our expectations of the hard boiled genre. They frequently use metaphors to describe everything. It is an unnatural and somewhat hackneyed style, and the fact that Lethem plays with it shows that his attitude toward this style is playful and inventive. He’s not interested in simply repeating old tropes of the genre, he’s seeking to reinvent it.

This comical tone reminds me of the film Pulp Fiction, by Quentin Tarantino. For example, in the one of the first scenes, where Samuel Jackson and John Travolta’s characters are having a casual conversation about a foot massage gone wrong, right before they have to go and kill a bunch of people. It’s a light-hearted send-up of the pulp film genre.

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Reading Response #1 (due Sep 1)

Please read until page 35 of Motherless Brooklyn, and respond to the prompt below. Your response should be a minimum of 200 and a maximum of 300 words. Please cite at least one passage in your response.

  • What effect do Lionel’s tics serve in this chapter? What do they add to either the tone of the story, his character, his relationship with the other characters, the story, etc. How would you describe his verbal tics? Do they remind you of anything (a character from a movie, a song, a poem, a book, etc.)?

To respond, click on “leave a comment” (written below). You’ll have to sign in with your WordPress account (or enter your email address and your name). Write your response. At the bottom of your response, please write your full name so I can identify you. Click on “post comment.” Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class.

You will not see your response when you post it. This is because I need to approve it first. Please don’t email me asking if it posted. Assume it did. Copy and paste your response onto a Word document and save a copy for yourself, just in case. You don’t need to print it and bring it to class. In the event that I didn’t receive your response because of a technical error, you can hand in your hard copy.

While I encourage you to read and be inspired by each other’s responses, each response must be completed individually. Feel free to quote each other, if you like. If you do, just make sure you give credit to the original author.

The responses are always due before class on the due date. You must attend class in order to be eligible for a grade on your response.